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The City of Grand Rapids wants to put an end to car-pedestrian crashes, so we’re making our message clear and simple for drivers: Stop for pedestrians. It’s the law. The City, with the support of the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning, is launching a first-of-its-kind pedestrian safety campaign to inform the community about our new ordinance that requires motorists to stop for pedestrians at all crosswalks. The campaign also reminds motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians of their responsibilities to make our active community safe for all travelers, no matter their mode of transportation. Welcome to Heads Up, GR!
MOTORISTS
PEDESTRIANS
Stop for pedestrians. It’s the law.
Stop for pedestrians. It’s the law.

A new ordinance has been passed in Grand Rapids, and it states: “The operator of a vehicle shall stop for a pedestrian crossing the roadway within any marked crosswalk, or within any unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, except at intersections where the movement of traffic is being regulated by a police officer or a traffic control signal; and at such regulated intersections operators of vehicles shall stop for all pedestrians crossing or who have started to cross the roadway on the "go" or "walk" signal.”

This simply means, when you encounter a pedestrian in any crosswalk (marked or unmarked at an intersection), you must stop. This does not include intersections where traffic signals or police officers are controlling traffic.

Don’t pass a stopped vehicle.
Don’t pass a stopped vehicle.

If you see a vehicle stopped in front of you, or in the lane next to you, be alert. It may be stopped for a pedestrian whom you can’t see and it is illegal to pass a vehicle that is stopped to allow a pedestrian to cross.

Don’t drive distracted.
Don’t drive distracted.

We all know how dangerous it is to use your devices while driving, so keep them out of reach so you won’t be tempted to look at them. But that isn’t the only distraction that can be dangerous when you’re behind the wheel. GPS devices, changing the station on your radio, eating, drinking or reaching for an object can all take your eyes – and your mind – off the road.

Slow down.
Slow down.

Speed is a major cause of preventable accidents. Obeying the speed limit is safer for everybody. Stay under the limit so you have more time to be observant of your surroundings and be ready to stop for the unexpected.

Cross in expected locations when possible.
Cross in expected locations when possible.

Cross the street at an intersection or designated crosswalk when possible and always stop, then look left, right and left again before crossing.

Use extreme caution when crossing the street.
Use extreme caution when crossing the street.

A significant number of pedestrian-involved crashes are caused by pedestrians crossing the street from between parked cars. Motorists often can’t see these pedestrians until it’s too late. So, stop and look both ways if you may be hidden by another object before trying to cross the street. This is also recommended before crossing in front of a stopped vehicle, especially if additional lanes are traveling in the same direction.

Don’t walk distracted.
Don’t walk distracted.

Just as distracted driving is dangerous, so is distracted walking. Be alert at all times and don’t be distracted by electronic devices that take your eyes or ears off the road – especially when crossing.

Don’t rely on traffic signals alone.
Don’t rely on traffic signals alone.

Do not rely solely on pedestrian traffic signals. You should always be looking for motorists who may not be paying attention.

Make eye contact.
Make eye contact.

Try to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them and do not assume that because you can see the driver, the driver can see you.

Use sidewalks when possible.
Use sidewalks when possible.

When provided, make sure to utilize sidewalks. Otherwise, when there are no sidewalks available walk facing (against) oncoming traffic, as far left as possible.

MOTORISTS
Stop for pedestrians. It’s the law.
Stop for pedestrians. It’s the law.

A new ordinance has been passed in Grand Rapids, and it states: “The operator of a vehicle shall stop for a pedestrian crossing the roadway within any marked crosswalk, or within any unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, except at intersections where the movement of traffic is being regulated by a police officer or a traffic control signal; and at such regulated intersections operators of vehicles shall stop for all pedestrians crossing or who have started to cross the roadway on the "go" or "walk" signal.”

This simply means, when you encounter a pedestrian in any crosswalk (marked or unmarked at an intersection), you must stop. This does not include intersections where traffic signals or police officers are controlling traffic.

Don’t pass a stopped vehicle.
Don’t pass a stopped vehicle.

If you see a vehicle stopped in front of you, or in the lane next to you, be alert. It may be stopped for a pedestrian whom you can’t see and it is illegal to pass a vehicle that is stopped to allow a pedestrian to cross.

Don’t drive distracted.
Don’t drive distracted.

We all know how dangerous it is to use your devices while driving, so keep them out of reach so you won’t be tempted to look at them. But that isn’t the only distraction that can be dangerous when you’re behind the wheel. GPS devices, changing the station on your radio, eating, drinking or reaching for an object can all take your eyes – and your mind – off the road.

Slow down.
Slow down.

Speed is a major cause of preventable accidents. Obeying the speed limit is safer for everybody. Stay under the limit so you have more time to be observant of your surroundings and be ready to stop for the unexpected.

PEDESTRIANS
Cross in expected locations when possible.
Cross in expected locations when possible.

Cross the street at an intersection or designated crosswalk when possible and always stop, then look left, right and left again before crossing.

Use extreme caution when crossing the street.
Use extreme caution when crossing the street.

A significant number of pedestrian-involved crashes are caused by pedestrians crossing the street from between parked cars. Motorists often can’t see these pedestrians until it’s too late. So, stop and look both ways if you may be hidden by another object before trying to cross the street. This is also recommended before crossing in front of a stopped vehicle, especially if additional lanes are traveling in the same direction.

Don’t walk distracted.
Don’t walk distracted.

Just as distracted driving is dangerous, so is distracted walking. Be alert at all times and don’t be distracted by electronic devices that take your eyes or ears off the road – especially when crossing.

Don’t rely on traffic signals alone.
Don’t rely on traffic signals alone.

Do not rely solely on pedestrian traffic signals. You should always be looking for motorists who may not be paying attention.

Make eye contact.
Make eye contact.

Try to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them and do not assume that because you can see the driver, the driver can see you.

Use sidewalks when possible.
Use sidewalks when possible.

When provided, make sure to utilize sidewalks. Otherwise, when there are no sidewalks available walk facing (against) oncoming traffic, as far left as possible.